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Nokta FORS CoRe
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Garrett GTAx 550


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Nokta FORS CoRe
Garrett GTAx 550
Feature comparison between Nokta FORS CoRe and Garrett GTAx 550
Options Nokta FORS CoRe Garrett GTAx 550
Detector Type Coin and Relic Detector Coin and Relic Detector
Price $699 $500
Manufactured in 2014 2001
Battery Type 4 AA 8 AA
Weight (Lbs.) 3.9 3.2
Operating frequency 15 kHz.
Display Yes Yes
Backlight Yes No
Target ID Numeric
Tone ID 5 Tones
Search Modes
  • All-Metal (GEN)
  • 2 Tone mode (DI2)
  • 3 Tone mode (DI3)
  • Conductive Ground (COG)
  • Vibration Mode
Ability to change coils Yes Yes
Ground balance Auto, Manual, Tracking Auto
Waterproof Coil only Coil only
Warranty 2 Years
Number of Reviews graph 3
graph 4
graph 2
graph 3
Avg. User Rating 5.00 4.11
Avg. Durability Rating 4.67
Avg. Ease of Use Rating 4.67
Avg. Depth Rating
Depth value
No data available yet

Most helpful review for Nokta FORS CoRe

Impressive
A friend of mine recommended it. I didn't know it was Turkish, but it did the job, was great at the beach, I am now experimenting with it in the Israeli forests near historic sites etc.... Great detector for the money....
Ido from Israel

Thumbs up! 22
Read all reviews for Nokta FORS CoRe

Most helpful review for Garrett GTAx 550

Agreed, a good unit for the money
I have used the GTAx-550 for about two years and have found an 1850 large cent, and a six-inch-deep 1877-S dime in a park I've hunted for nearly 20 years, not to mention a small silver cache and a number of other coins and relics. It is a good middle-of- the-line detector. I used its predecessor, the old GTA-500, for about twelve years, and that machine paid for itself four or five times over, at a conservative estimate. I found coins dating back to the colonial era with that detector, and a rare War of 1812 US Light Dragoons beltplate that I sold for $1,000, despite its being bent, corroded, and ugly.

Here are some minor criticisms of the Garrett machines I have used:

1. Jumpy target ID (though I have learned to "read between the lines" and interpret some of those strange readings. To be fair, most if not all machines will perform erratically over certain targets, like large iron).

2. Less accurate discrimination than other brands I've tried (when set to reject something, the machine still beeps and ID's targets in that range sometimes). Is my sensitivity set too high? Maybe. But I still say the Bounty Hunter, Fisher, Tesoro, and Troy detectors I have used had much cleaner discrimination.

3. Fairly poor salt water beach performance, even when sensitivity is reduced. I could never get my old GTA-500 to work at all on the beach, despite the manufacturer's claims. I have gotten the GTAx-550 to work, but I felt its performance wasn't great. I've seen other folks with cheaper Garrett detectors do okay on the beach, though. I think my lack of success there is due partially my own lack of beachcombing expertise, but not entirely so.

4. The owners' manuals I have read were long on hype and short on useful information. They provided some useful info, but they also tooted their own horn too much and gushed about the product.

Those are my only real criticisms. Everything else is good.

I have noticed that nail and bottlecap rejection on the Garrets I have used (GTA-350, GTA-500, GTAx-550, GTI-2500) is pretty good, at least in my soil conditions, and better than some other brands I've used. I've used Fishers that seemed to love nails- I guess every machine must have that one trash item it really loves. The Garretts seem to like foil- it often reads in the nickel range.

Overall I have more experience with the GTA-500 and its modern counterpart, the GTAx-550, than with any other model or brand of detector. Sure, they have their quirks, but the fact that I've used them for more than a decade should tell you something- they're good machines.
Rob Shinnick from Golden Isles of Georgia

Thumbs up! 67
Read all reviews for Garrett GTAx 550